An In-Depth Analysis of User Comments on YouTube

User comments are the most popular but also extremely controversial form of communication on YouTube. Their public image is very poor; users generally expect that most comments will be of little value or even in thoroughly bad taste. Nevertheless, heaps of comments continue to be posted every day. We propose an explanation for this contradiction in user attitudes and behaviour based on a new comment classification approach which captures salient aspects of YouTube comments. We show that, based on our new classification, we are able to perform very fast lightweight semantic video analysis. In addition, our results indicate that users’ video perceptions (Likes and Dislikes) are indeed influenced by the dispersion of valuable and inferior comments.

Full article: http://goo.gl/t7NfmE

Making the most of MOOCs via video tutorials

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The use of online video tutorials as a supplement to traditional materials has become increasingly popular in MOOCs. Video is growing in popularity as a powerful communication and instructional medium in online courses. Using video, instructors can deliver instruction that is difficult to convey using other channels. Today, MOOCs providers are investing in video-based technology such as lecture capture and video streaming services with the aim of providing better access to quality video materials. However, video production technology varies from simple desktop recording tools to sophisticated studio production systems. Many organizational and financial factors influence how these systems are implemented, including the instructors’ experiences and skills, infrastructure and support, budget, and the educational context in which the video will be used. The findings of research indicate that both lecture capture and screencasting recordings served as useful types of video for student learning in MOOCs. However, the majority of students preferred the quality and usefulness of the screencasting recordings to lecture capture recordings. One reason reported by students is that screencasting videos combined quality sound with rich graphical and textual content, items that were not available during the process of capturing live lectures. This note is considered a step toward exploring how to produce and use video tutorials in different scenarios to improve student experience and interest in MOOCs.

YouTube API 3.0 Video Uploader

Video Uploader 3.0 is a YouTube API-based PHP script that lets you add YouTube uploading functionality to your own website or web application. It allows your users to upload videos directly to your own YouTube Channel, without the need to sign in to YouTube or even have Google Account. The script uses the latest version (3.0) of YouTube Application Programming Interface (API) to upload videos and and set the video’s metadata (title, description, tags, status, and category). The script uses Google OAuth 2.0 endpoints to create web server application that use OAuth 2.0 authorization to access Google APIs. OAuth 2.0 allows you to share specific data with an application while keeping your Google Account usernames, passwords, and other information private.

http://viduploader3.com

ICEL 2016 Kwynote: Making the most of MOOCs via video tutorials

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The use of online video tutorials as a supplement to traditional materials has become increasingly popular in MOOCs. Video is growing in popularity as a powerful communication and instructional medium in online courses. Using video, instructors can deliver instruction that is difficult to convey using other channels. Today, MOOCs providers are investing in video-based technology such as lecture capture and video streaming services with the aim of providing better access to quality video materials. However, video production technology varies from simple desktop recording tools to sophisticated studioproduction systems. Many organizational and financial factors influence how these systems are implemented, including the instructors’ experiences and skills, infrastructure and support, budget, and the educational context in which the video will be used.The findings of research indicate that both lecture capture and screencasting recordings served as useful types of video for student learning in MOOCs. However, the majority of students preferred the quality and usefulness of the screencasting recordings to lecture capture recordings. One reason reported by students is that screencasting videos combined quality sound with rich graphical and textual content, items that were not available during the process of capturing live lectures.This note is considered a step toward exploring how toproduce and use video tutorials in different scenarios to improve student experience and interest in MOOCs.

http://www.academic-conferences.org/conferences/icel

WSIS Prizes 2016

ABOUTWSIS Prizes is an immediate response to the requests expressed by WSIS stakeholders during the WSIS Forum 2011: to create a mechanism to evaluate and reward stakeholders for their efforts in the implementation of WSIS outcomes. The WSIS Prizes are an integral part of the WSIS Stocktaking Process that was set up in 2004 (Para 120, Tunis Agenda).The WSIS Prizes contest provides the platform to identify and showcase the success stories and models that could be replicated, to empower the community at the local level, to give the chance to everyone to participate in the contest and mainly to recognize the efforts of stakeholders for their added value to society and commitment towards achieving WSIS goals.The contest of WSIS Prizes is open to all stakeholders: governments, private sector, civil society, international organizations, academia and others. The contest comprises 18 categories that are directly linked to the WSIS Action Lines outlined in the Geneva Plan of Action.The contest of WSIS Prizes 2016 is organized into five phases beginning on 13 October 2015. The 18 winners of WSIS Prizes will be honored, recognized and presented with an award during WSIS Prizes 2016 Ceremony at the WSIS Forum 2016, to be held from 2 to 6 May 2016 in Geneva, Switzerland

Source: WSIS Prizes 2016

Presentation Tips | PresentationTube

Keep it Simple

PowerPoint uses slides with a horizontal or “Landscape” orientation. The software was designed as a convenient way to display graphical information that would support the speaker and supplement the presentation. The slides themselves were never meant to be the “star of the show” (the star, of course, is your audience). People came to hear you and be moved or informed (or both) by you and your message. Don’t let your message and your ability to tell a story get derailed by slides that are unnecessarily complicated, busy, or full of what Edward Tufte calls “chart junk.” Nothing in your slide should be superfluous, ever. Your slides should have plenty of “white space” or “negative space.” Do not feel compelled to fill empty areas on your slide with your logo or other unnecessary graphics or text boxes that do not contribute to better understanding. The less clutter you have on your slide, the more powerful your visual message will become.
By Garr Reynolds

Source: Presentation Tips | PresentationTube

Screen Capture Technology in Translation Process Research | Saber Zahedi – Academia.edu

The present study aims to provide guidelines for using screen capture technology in translation process research. Screen capture technology refers to digital recording of actions on a computer screen. The study shows how a researcher, making use of screen capture, can obtain information regarding the difficulties and issues involved in the process of translation. In this study, a group of translators were given limited amount of time to complete their work, and at the same time their performance on the computer screen was recorded by means of a screen capture application. The data provided valuable information such as self-correction, pause, compromising, dictionary use, shortcuts and immediate revision in the process of translation. Using such a device, one could reduce the former disadvantages in translation process research using think-aloud protocols which made the participants conscious of being studied. The article finally lists a number of advantages of using this method as well as its limitations.

Source: Screen Capture Technology in Translation Process Research | Saber Zahedi – Academia.edu

Screencasting to Engage Learning | EDUCAUSE

Students in both K–12 and higher education will spend all of their personal and professional lives immersed in a digital society. Educators in today’s classrooms must be able to use and integrate both current and emerging technologies. One of the keys to effective 21st century teaching is to balance traditional pedagogical methods with the effective use of technology to foster learning.Many educational technology tools can be used in instruction; however, one fundamentally useful tool in teaching is the screencast. A screencast can provide learners a student-centered and engaging learning experience in both distance and traditional learning settings. Screencasts enable teachers to create a digital recording of any instructional activity performed on a computer screen,1 and they can be used as learning resources, learning tasks, and learning support.2

Source: Screencasting to Engage Learning | EDUCAUSE

Screen capture (screen cast) software

Screen capture (screen cast) software can be used to develop short videos for training purposes. Developing videos is quick and easy. This article describes how these videos are used as tools to reinforce face-to-face and interactive TV curriculum training in a nutrition education program. Advantages of developing these videos are shared. Suggestions for how these videos can be used in other ways are offered

Source: The Journal of Extension (JOE)

ICEL • Academic Conferences and Publishing International

The International Conference on e-Learning was established 11 years ago. It has been held in Malaysia, Chile, Hong Kong, The Bahamas, South Africa, to mention only a few of the countries who have hosted it. ICEL is generally attended by participants from more than 25 countries and attracts an interesting combination of academic scholars, practitioners and individuals who are engaged in various aspects of e-Learning. Among other journals, the Electronic Journal of e-Learning publishes a special edition of the best papers presented at this conference.

ICEL 2016 is being held at the Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia and the Conference Chair is Prof. Dr. Rozhan M. Idrus

Source: ICEL • Academic Conferences and Publishing International